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peer-reviewed research article

Structural adjustment, resources, global economy to challenge California agriculture

authors

Warren E. Johnston, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics
Harold O. Carter, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

publication information

California Agriculture 54(4):16-22. DOI: 10.3733/ca.v054n04p16. July-August 2000.

abstract

California agriculture now faces perhaps its greatest challenges: to maintain productivity in the face of rapid population growth, compete effectively for global markets and manage increasingly scarce natural resources. Intensification is a dominant feature of California agriculture, evident in the increase in fruits, vegetables, nuts and value-added products. But risk is also substantially greater in the production and marketing of these crops than in less-intensive commodities. Agriculture must confront and deal with heightened public concerns about food safety, clean water, pesticide use, groundwater contamination, worker safety, open space and the long-term sustainability of scarce natural resources, ecosystems and species. Nonetheless, we believe that California's agricultural sector has adapted and responded to similar challenges in the past and will continue to do so in the future.

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