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California Agriculture, January 1979

Volume 33, Number 1

Peer-reviewed Research Articles

Factors affecting agricultural land prices
by B. Delworth Gardner, Carole Frank Nuckton
pp4-6, doi#10.3733/ca.v033n01p4
Abstract
The 1970's brought such rapid increases in land prices that one is compelled to look for forces that have had special impact.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Warp reduction in young-growth ponderosa pine studs
by Donald G. Arganbright, James A. Venturino, Michael R. Gorvad
pp6-8, doi#10.3733/ca.v033n01p6
Abstract
Conventional kiln-drying under restraint with an initial plasticization treatment reduced fall-down from 51.0 percent to 34.4 percent.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Some forces affecting our changing American agriculture
by Harold O. Carter, Warren E. Johnston, Carole Frank Nuckton
pp9-10, doi#10.3733/ca.v033n01p9
Abstract
The changing interface between commercial agriculture and quasi-agricultural interests in rural areas and the rising capital requirements in farming suggest an emerging compromise in the form of a dual rural economy: (1) large commercial farm units, and (2) smaller farms, based on subsistence, part-time, retirement, or hobby interests.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Gaseous ammonia losses following nitrogen fertilization
by Joseph H. Connell, Roland D. Meyer, Jewell L. Meyer, Robert M. Carlson
pp11-12, doi#10.3733/ca.v033n01p11
Abstract
Fertilizer nitrogen can be lost when gaseous ammonia volatilizes following surface application of urea fertilizer. Fertilizer placement 1½ inches deep can help prevent significant losses from occurring.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Apple russet on Yellow Newtown Pippin
by George C. Martin, Ronald H. Tyler, Chic Nishijima
pp13-14, doi#10.3733/ca.v033n01p13
Abstract
Using compounds that were successful in treating russet-sensitive Golden Delicious apples, scientists tested Yellow Newtown Pippins in the Pajaro Valley for response against russeting. The treatments did not reduce russet enough to warrant use.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Editorial, News, Letters and Science briefs

EDITORIAL: Debunking myths
by J. B. Kendrick
pp2, doi#10.3733/ca.v033n01p2
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Hilgard and California viticulture

by Maynard A. Amerine
pp1-23, doi#10.3733/hilg.v33n01p001
Abstract
Abstract does not appear. First page follows.Foreword Eugene Waldemar Hilgard was born in Germany in 1833 and spent his early years in Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois. When he was sixteen he went to Europe to study geology and chemistry in Switzerland and Germany, receiving his doctorate in chemistry from Heidelberg. In 1855 he became State Geologist of Mississippi, and later Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Experimental and Agricultural Chemistry at the University of Mississippi. From 1873 to 1875 he was Professor of Geology and Natural History at the University of Michigan. After this, he came to the University of California as Professor of Agriculture and Botany, later becoming Director of Experiment Stations and Dean of the College of Agriculture. He became Emeritus in 1906 and died at the age of eighty-three in 1916. Hilgard's significant contributions to soil science have recently been recorded in the book E. W. Hilgard and the Birth of Modern Soil Science by Professor Hans Jenny (1961). The purpose of this paper is to review Hilgard's significant contributions to California viticulture and enology. Although the Prohibition period removed many of the results of Hilgard's work from California vineyards, the influence of his far-reaching and systematic attack on the problems of California's grape and wine industry can still be detected today. Introduction Before he came to California in 1875, Hilgard had little, if any, professional training in viticulture or enology. Yet during the twenty years which followed he made permanent contributions to the viticultural industry of the state and established the University of California as an important center of research in viticulture and enology. This is particularly noteworthy for a man who had many other professional interests. Hilgard was not without knowledge of grapes and wines prior to his work in California. This was undoubtedly a result of his father's interest in the
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Hilgard and California viticulture

by Maynard A. Amerine
pp1-23, doi#10.3733/hilg.v33n01p001
Abstract
Abstract does not appear. First page follows.Foreword Eugene Waldemar Hilgard was born in Germany in 1833 and spent his early years in Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois. When he was sixteen he went to Europe to study geology and chemistry in Switzerland and Germany, receiving his doctorate in chemistry from Heidelberg. In 1855 he became State Geologist of Mississippi, and later Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Experimental and Agricultural Chemistry at the University of Mississippi. From 1873 to 1875 he was Professor of Geology and Natural History at the University of Michigan. After this, he came to the University of California as Professor of Agriculture and Botany, later becoming Director of Experiment Stations and Dean of the College of Agriculture. He became Emeritus in 1906 and died at the age of eighty-three in 1916. Hilgard's significant contributions to soil science have recently been recorded in the book E. W. Hilgard and the Birth of Modern Soil Science by Professor Hans Jenny (1961). The purpose of this paper is to review Hilgard's significant contributions to California viticulture and enology. Although the Prohibition period removed many of the results of Hilgard's work from California vineyards, the influence of his far-reaching and systematic attack on the problems of California's grape and wine industry can still be detected today. Introduction Before he came to California in 1875, Hilgard had little, if any, professional training in viticulture or enology. Yet during the twenty years which followed he made permanent contributions to the viticultural industry of the state and established the University of California as an important center of research in viticulture and enology. This is particularly noteworthy for a man who had many other professional interests. Hilgard was not without knowledge of grapes and wines prior to his work in California. This was undoubtedly a result of his father's interest in the
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General Information

Gifts and donations
Editors
pp14-15, doi#10.3733/ca.v033n01p14
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